Colorado Mining Association

Website: https://www.coloradomining.org/

Mission Statement

The Colorado Mining Association (CMA), established in 1876, is the oldest professional mining industry trade association in the U.S. Its membership numbers nearly 1,000 individuals and companies. The CMA membership is comprised of companies who are actively engaged in the exploration, production, and refining of metals, coal and industrial minerals. Membership also includes businesses and individuals that offer services and supplies to the mining industry.”

Summary

CMA is the oldest mining professional association whose membership also includes companies that are engage in exploring, producing, and refining metals, coal and industrial minerals. Its president, Stan Dempsey, has praised Donald Trump for rolling back conservation standards and lifting the moratorium on coal leasing. The group opposed a new permitting rule aimed at protecting vulnerable streams, and supports weakening clean-up requirements for mining companies.

Notable Activities and Statements on Public Lands Policy

Colorado Mining Association (CMA) President Stan Dempsey Praised President Trump’s Decision to Lift a Moratorium on Coal Leases.

CMA President Dempsey Claimed the Coal Industry Could Finally be Competitive after Trump Rescinded the Clean Power Plan (CPP). Dempsey continued with his editorial about how the rollback would help the coal industry by writing: “Just a few months ago, those waging the ‘war on coal’ felt like they were on the precipice of victory. Now, they are in full retreat. The industry can finally compete again without having both of its arms tied behind its back by an overzealous Environmental Protection Agency and Department of the Interior,” Dempsey wrote. [Stan Dempsey, “Colorado coal saved from costly power plan,” Denver Post, 04/02/17]

  • Dempsey Called the Clean Power Plan “Anti-Coal.” Dempsey wrote an editorial praising the Trump administration’s energy policies, stating, “Fortunately, the Trump administration has done just what it promised. By executive order, President Donald Trump…axed the power plan along with another vestige of the Obama administration’s anti-coal policy, the moratorium on all new leases of federal coal reserves,” which “was designed to keep America’s largest source of coal firmly in the ground.” Stan Dempsey, “Colorado coal saved from costly power plan,” Denver Post, 04/02/17]

Dempsey Applauded the West End Mine Federal Lease Modifications. “In Colorado, Dempsey hailed the decision to modify a federal lease for the West Elk mine located in Gunnison County. The process was started in February 2016 under the Obama administration. The mine wants to expand its existing leases by a total of 1,720 acres and the U.S. Forest Service issued a draft decision in September [2017] agreeing with the proposal.” [Cathy Proctor, “Trump and Colorado energy – a powerful impact,” Denver Business Journal, 11/24/17]

The Colorado Mining Association Opposed a Permitting Rule Aimed at Protecting Vulnerable Streams.

Colorado Mining Association (CMA) President Stan Dempsey Claimed that the Stream Protection Rule Violated the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. Dempsey wrote in an editorial that the Stream Protection rule, which set environmental conditions for the issuance of mining permits, “duplicates or supersedes regulatory requirements and programs managed by other agencies, in violation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act.” [Stan Dempsey, “Stream Protection Rule will hurt mining,” Durango Herald, 11/08/16]

The Colorado Mining Association Supports Weakening Clean-Up Requirements for Mining Companies.

Colorado Mining Association (CMA) President Stan Dempsey Praised the Trump Administration’s Decision Not to Implement an EPA Rule on Mining Cleanup Requirements.‘The president and his secretaries have done exactly what they said they were going to do (in rolling back regulations),’ said CMA President Dempsey.” A “‘significant Trump action…was the decision not to go forward with EPA’s rule on CERCLA 108(b). That was EPA basically imposing a secondary requirement for mines to demonstrate their ability to provide financial assurance of their operations.’ CERCLA 108(b) was an EPA rule proposed in the waning days of the Obama administration to require more financial assurances from mining companies to fund long-term cleanup.” [David O. Williams, “Trump’s EPA emboldens Colorado mining industry while Superfund cleanups lag,” Colorado Springs Gazette, 05/27/18]

Colorado Mining Association (CMA) President Dempsey Called Proposed Legislation to Require Mining Companies to Improve Their Ability to Cover the Costs of Clean-Ups “Anti-Mining.” “Colorado Mining Association president Stan Dempsey said his organization will fight the bill. ‘We’ve been looking at it…and it appears to be anti-mining,’ Dempsey said. ‘It appears to be a bill designed to prohibit new mining in Colorado.’” [Bruce Finley, “State lawmakers look to prevent mining disasters,” Denver Post, 03/21/18]

Colorado Mining Association (CMA) President Dempsey Said Companies Should Not Be Held Liable for the Clean-Up of Their Predecessors. “‘The right approach, which I think both senators in Colorado support, is enactment of a good Samaritan law, which says if you’re going to go in and work on a historic site, that you’re not going to be held responsible for previous operator’s (cleanup liabilities).’” [David O. Williams, “Trump’s EPA emboldens Colorado mining industry while Superfund cleanups lag,” Colorado Springs Gazette, 05/27/18]

Colorado Mining Association (CMA) President Stan Dempsey Opposed Modernizing Royalty Collection Requirements to include a Clean-up Fund. There was “a push to reform the 1872 Mining Act to charge royalties for hard-rock mining on federal lands and create a cleanup fund. ‘Imposing taxes is the wrong approach,’ Dempsey said. [David O. Williams, “Trump’s EPA emboldens Colorado mining industry while Superfund cleanups lag,” Colorado Springs Gazette, 05/27/18]

Lobbying and Political Contributions

Expenditures

2015 Lobbying/Political Expenditure: $253,835

2016 Lobbying/Political Expenditure: $258,847

[Source: Colorado Mining Association Form 990, 2015-16]

Firms/Lobbyists Listing CMA as client

Peter Calbert (Terminated 6/17/2013)

Stuart A Sanderson (Terminated 5/25/17)

Orf & Orf (Active)

May 2018

  • HB 1215 Safe Disposal Naturally Occur Radioactive Material
  • SB 245 Allow Natural Occurring Radioactive Material Rules
  • SB 226 Prohibit Colorado Involvement Climate Alliance
  • SB 178 Similar Coverage Independent Commercial Vehicles
  • SB 043 Senate State Office Nominee Rejection Effects
  • OTHER electricity generation
  • OTHER Air quality regulation and other governmental activity affecting mining and utilities
  • OTHER reclamation bonding
  • OTHER severance tax matters
  • HB 1428 Authorize Utility Community Collaboration Contract
  • HB 1400 Increase Fees Stationary Sources Air Pollutants
  • HB 1338 Reduced Revenue Severance Tax Operational Fund Transfers
  • HB 1297 Climate Change Preparedness And Resiliency
  • HB 1271 Public Utilities Commission Electric Utilities Economic Development Rates

Ted Orf (Active)

May 2018

  • Air quality regulation and other governmental activity affecting mining and utilities
  • Water quality issues
  • severance tax issues
  • Reclamation Fees
  • electric generation

[Source: Colorado Secretary of State]

CMA Payments to Orf & Orf

2016: $113,859

2015: $110,838

2014: $113,937

[Source: Colorado Mining Association Form 990, 2014-16]

Political Contributions

Top 10 Recipients of Colorado Mining Association Contributions

2017 2016 2015 2014 TOTAL
Resources For A Better Colorado * $50,000 $100,000 $150,000
Senate Majority Fund $1,000 $11,000 $5,000 $5,000 $22,000
Coloradans For Responsible Reform $12,500 $12,500
Colorado Citizens’ Alliance $500 $5,000 $5,500
Colorado Leadership Fund LLC $3,000 $2,500 $5,500
Beauprez For Colorado $1,250 $1,250
Colorado Business Political Action Committee (Cbpac) $550 $550 $1,100
Bernie Herpin For Senate District 11 $1,000 $1,000
Committee to Elect Don Suppes to State Senate $900 $900
Committee to Elect J. Paul Brown $400 $400 $800
TOTAL (All Contributions) $1,000 $69,675 $11,050 $131,150 $212,875

* Resources For A Better Colorado is a related tax exempt 527 political organization.

Coloradans for Natural Resources is a related 501c4 organization that does not appear on Schedule C.  

[Source: Colorado Mining Association Form 990, 2016]

Contributions to Elected Officials

2011:

Governor John Hickenlooper (CO): $451.59

2014:

Attorney General Cynthia Coffman (CO): $1,100

State Senator Ray Scott (CO): $200

[Source: FollowTheMoney.org]

Revenue and Expenditures

Revenue

2016: $1,122,273

Membership Dues: $651,305

Annual Conference: $294,145

Special Projects: $133,680

Assets: $1,714,731

Publicly Traded Securities: $883,360

Cash: $816,081

2015: $1,223,558

Membership Dues: $620,270

Annual Conference: $433,433

Special Projects: $124,648

Assets: $1,505,178

Publicly Traded Securities $901,194

Cash: $595,846

2014: $1,391,341

2013: $1,511,550

[Source: Colorado Mining Association Form 990, 2013-2016]

Expenses

2016: $1,325,624

Salaries and Wages: $409,396

Special Projects: $219,143

Conferences/Meetings: $167,887

Employee Benefits: $120,470

Lobbying: $116,026

2015: $1,167,719

Officer/Director Comp: $295,113

Special Projects: $267,827

Conferences/Meetings: $49,133

Other Salaries & Wages: $142,221

Lobbying: $112,617

2014: $1,349,166

2013: $1,317,848

[Source: Colorado Mining Association Form 990, 2013-16]